Turbo

When BC and Alberta plumbers collide

What happens when BC and Alberta Plumbers Collide?

When BC and Alberta plumber collide

When BC and Alberta plumbers collide. What could go wrong when two head strong and very experienced plumbers meet head to head. One from BC and one from Alberta? Interested in finding out the results? Watch the video above, spoiler alert the results are absolutely fabulous!!

The good and bad of social media can be debated for decades with the merits of each side validated and proven. Yet this week we understood and felt the powerful good that social media can provide with an amazing collaboration between to fantastic plumbers. When BC and Alberta plumber collide

Pete smiling as BC and Alberta plumbers collide

How it happened

We been in contact with Turbo Plumbing and Heating for several years and as he was passing through Calgary to visit some family. He decided to stop in for a visit. After asking if he had work clothes and steel toes, we immediately put him to work!! Watch the video above and watch in real time as Robbie puts Baker’s latest J-man and young apprentice through the paces of a pipe replacement. In the particular job we use 3 of 4 methods of joining pipe. First and my personal favorite, Victaulic, next is the latest tech and the use of Press tech.Finally we use the tired and true, mechanical threading. We could have used solder as well but considering the time we decided to skip it.

Commercial heating systems is one of the many fields that Baker Plumbing prides itself in being an expert in. As a 4th generation company you can watch the latest generation work with Rob. Completing some complex tasks in short order!!

Check Turbo on IG and on the web at TURBO PLUMBING and of course come check us out at BAKER PLUMBING

Have plumbing or heating needs in BC or Alberta these two companies have all the bases covered!!

Alberta Septic Fields/Tanks and Freezing

Question#2: How do I keep my septic field or tank from freezing?

Thanks to Martin for asking this question.

A septic system is a highly efficient, self-contained, underground wastewater treatment system. Because septic systems treat and dispose of household wastewater onsite, they are often more economical than centralized sewer systems in rural areas where lot sizes are larger and houses are spaced widely apart.

Alberta Septic Tank Installation

Septic systems are also simple in design, which make them generally less expensive to install and maintain. And by using natural processes to treat the wastewater onsite, usually in a homeowner’s backyard, septic systems don’t require the installation of miles of sewer lines, making them less disruptive to the environment.

A septic system consists of two main; a septic tank and a drain-field. The septic tank is a watertight box, usually made of concrete or fiberglass, with an inlet and outlet pipe. Wastewater flows from the home to the septic tank through the sewer pipe. The septic tank treats the wastewater naturally by holding it in the tank long enough for solids and liquids to separate. The wastewater forms three layers inside the tank. Solids lighter than water (such as greases and oils) float to the top forming a layer of scum. Solids heavier than water settle at the bottom of the tank forming a layer of sludge. This leaves a middle layer of partially clarified wastewater.

The layers of sludge and scum remain in the septic tank where bacteria found naturally in the wastewater work to break the solids down. The sludge and scum that cannot be broken down are retained in the tank until the tank is pumped.

The layer of clarified liquid flows from the septic tank to the drain-field or to a distribution device, which helps to uniformly distribute the wastewater in the drain-field. A standard drain-field (also known as a leaching field, disposal field, or a soil absorption system) is a series of trenches or a bed lined with gravel or course sand and buried one to three feet below the ground surface. Perforated pipes or drain tiles run through the trenches to distribute the wastewater. The drain-field treats the wastewater by allowing it to slowly trickle from the pipes out into the gravel and down through the soil. The gravel and soil act as biological filters.

The use of septic fields goes back a hundred years or so. The first ones were very simple holding containers that would eventually leach into the ground. I even saw a septic tank made out of an old car (I wish I had pictures of it). Anyway the tank and piping of a septic tank usually are not buried very deep. Typically between 18″ to 36″ for the pipe and 6′ to 8′ for the bottom of the tank.

As long as the tank is being used you should have no problems with the tank or lines freezing. The bacteria that break down the effluent (poo and other assorted materials) create quite a bit of heat which keeps everything toasty. I couple of rules to remember though.

  1. Keep all traffic off the drain line from the house to septic, the septic tank and field. That includes foot traffic, horses, cars, anything with weight to it that can drive the frost further into the ground causing freeze ups
  2. Straws bales can be your best friend. Piling bales over the tank and building sewer can further insulate the lines and protect them
  3. Keep your field manicured (cut the grass). This helps aid the transfer of gases that the bacteria create to the atmosphere and will keep your field fit and operational

Some Do Not’s

  1. Do not add anti-freeze, salt or a spetic additive to system
  2. Do not pump sewage to the surface
  3. Do not start a fire over the system to unthaw
  4. Do not run water continually to unfreeze

A typically system looks something like this.

Alberta Septic Tank Installation

Some of the restrictions for installing a septic fields are outlined here.

Septic tank installation set-backs

Summer Plumbing in Alberta

With summertime on the way, the last thing you want to think about is your plumbing. This is especially true if you plan to spend more than a few nights a week lounging in the Jacuzzi tub, or swimming in your pool. Summer typically means the showers run more than a few times a day, especially as you come in hot and sweaty from exercise or outdoor play. Good plumbing means a happy home, and in order to keep it that way you will want to head off plumbing problems before they require some expensive work.

You don’t need to get a certificate in plumbing mechanics to know how to keep good pipes and fixtures. Just take care not do overdo a few things and not to abuse plumbing during crucial months. Here are a few things to keep in mind:

1) Watch how you use the garbage disposal. Summer may mean you’ll cook at home more, and make use of your sinks and disposal. Take care, though, not to get carried away by chucking vegetable peels and other compost down the drain. It’s a disposal, not a garbage can. Limit the waste to small shards and liquids when possible.

2) Keep an eye on the common bathrooms. Do you have kids? If so, chances are you’ll have frequent visitors this summer. You’ll want to make sure the toilets flush properly and little ones are not running off while leaving the faucets running.

3) Keep home plumbing tools handy. In case of accidents, have a good plunger and brand of plumbing liquid around to solve minor clogging issues. Some emergencies are not as harrowing as you may first think; your best defense is a clear head, calm hands, and a bit of research to get your plumbing operational again.

4) Watch usage of water for outdoor purposes. You might spend more time watering the lawn, or your kids may wish to fill up a pool. If you have not used outdoor spigots in several months, start gently with the water flow and make sure your hoses and sprinklers are working correctly. If you had a previous cold snap and did nothing for your outdoor plumbing, you may encounter problems. Always err on the side of caution.

With summertime comes more time to play, relax, and garden. As you are more likely to use your fixtures and water at home, you’ll want to head off plumbing issues before they get out of hand. Be vigilant and you should be fine.

If things turn out not to be fine, give us a call at 403-279-7554 or book online.